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Find brand new office furniture for your local Orlando organization or business at Capital Office Furniture. Need help? Our dedicated sales people can help in the selection of your next file, cubicle, desk or chair.

Are you looking to modify your surroundings with new office furniture in Orlando? Improve efficiency and comfort with new office furniture out of Capital Office Furniture. Whether it’s setting up a home office or an office for 100, we provide turnkey office furniture solutions. We offer furniture installs in Orlando and across the Central Florida Region.

 

Orlando () is a city in the U.S. state of Florida and the county seat of Orange County. In Central Florida, it is the center of the Orlando metropolitan area, which had a population of 2,509,831, according to U.S. Census Bureau figures released in July 2017, making it the 23rd-largest metropolitan area in the United States, the sixth-largest metropolitan area in the Southern United States, and the third-largest metropolitan area in Florida. As of 2019, Orlando had an estimated city-proper population of 287,442, making it the 71st-largest city in the United States, the fourth-largest city in Florida, and the state’s largest inland city.

The City of Orlando is nicknamed “the City Beautiful”, and its symbol is the Linton E. Allen Memorial Fountain, commonly referred to as simply the “Lake Eola fountain” at Lake Eola Park. The Orlando International Airport (MCO) is the thirteenth-busiest airport in the United States and the 29th-busiest in the world.

Orlando is one of the most-visited cities in the world primarily driven by tourism, major events, and convention traffic; in 2018 the city drew more than 75 million visitors. The two largest and most internationally renowned tourist attractions in the Orlando area include the Walt Disney World Resort, opened by the Walt Disney Company in 1971, and located approximately 21 miles (34 km) southwest of Downtown Orlando in Bay Lake; and the Universal Orlando Resort, opened in 1990 as a major expansion of Universal Studios Florida. With the exception of Walt Disney World, most major attractions are located along International Drive with one of these attractions being the Wheel at ICON Park Orlando. The city is also one of the busiest American cities for conferences and conventions; the Orange County Convention Center is the second-largest convention facility in the United States.

Like other major cities in the Sun Belt, Orlando grew rapidly from the 1980s up into the first decade of the 21st century. Orlando is home to the University of Central Florida, which is the largest university campus in the United States in terms of enrollment as of 2015. In 2010, Orlando was listed as a “Gamma−” level global city in the World Cities Study Group’s inventory.

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Information on Orlando

There are very few archaeological sites in the area today, except for the former site of Fort Gatlin along the shores of modern-day Lake Gatlin south of downtown Orlando.

In 1823, the Treaty of Moultrie Creek created a Seminole reservation encompassing much of central Florida, including the area which would become Orlando. The Indian Removal Act of 1830 authorized relocation of the Seminole from Florida to Oklahoma, leading to the Second Seminole War. In 1842 white settlement in the area was encouraged by the Armed Occupation Act.

After Mosquito County was divided in 1845, Fort Gatlin became the county seat of the newly created Orange County in 1856. It remained a rural backwater during the Civil War and suffered greatly during the Union blockade. The Reconstruction Era brought on a population explosion, resulting in the incorporation of the Town of Orlando on July 31, 1875 with 85 residents (22 voters). For a short time in 1879 the town revoked its charter, and was subsequently re-incorporated. Orlando was established as a city in 1885.

The period from 1875 to 1895 is remembered as Orlando’s Golden Era, when it became the hub of Florida’s citrus industry. The period ended with the Great Freeze of 1894–95, which forced many owners to give up their independent citrus groves, thus consolidating holdings in the hands of a few “citrus barons” who shifted operations south, primarily around Lake Wales in Polk County. The freeze caused many in Florida, including many Orlandoans, to move elsewhere, mostly to the North, California, or the Caribbean.

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